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At one point or another my directs have sent me LinkedIn requests. It has been my position not to connect to directs, be they FTE's, or Contractors. Reasoning: I prefer my directs not be linked to my professional contacts and LinkedIn stream postings - that site is for me and I do not want to have to filter my posts (always appropriate) specific to my interests inside, or outside my firm.

Again this week, I received a request from a contractor - also an internal stakeholder, a marketing person below my level.  I am concerned about saying no, especially as they are both in the same office however, I want to feel free to express ideas on my (home page stream) and do not want people eying my page - tend to be private outside the office and in personal affairs.

Btw, our firm just launch a tibbr social media Hub and I have connected to my directs and others on that internal-only platform - so I feel that is the platform to connect to these folks.  At my wife's firm, everyone connects with everyone else.

Am I over-thinking this, what are others doing, thoughts?

tlhausmann's picture

http://www.manager-tools.com/2010/04/getting-started-with-linkedin-part-1

http://www.manager-tools.com/2009/06/rule-50

http://www.manager-tools.com/2006/05/building-a-network

] I do not want to have to filter my posts

By virtue of you posting on-line, at all, it is safe to assume at a point in the future your directs will see your posts through other channels.

Relationships create opportunities.

duplicate_account_MarkAus's picture

There's no such thing as private if you post it online.   Anyone who wants to do some research on you could find that stuff in 10 minutes anyway.  The words confidential and internet do not go together.

With all social networks - if you are on them, people have an expectation of accessibility.  As in, if you are putting yourself out there they expect you to interact with them.   Not saying it is right, but it is true.   What I'm saying is that knocking back work colleagues creates relationship risk - especially on a "professional" arena such as Linkedin.

(Don't get me wrong, I knock back people all the time on Linkedin - but I accept the risks to our relationship)

My advice would be to keep Linkedin for professional purposes only.  Use another social network for your non-work stuff.  

 

dtiller's picture

I don't quite understand your concern with connecting up with your directs.  I use LinkedIn as my roladex (anyone remember those?).  As stated above, you are in the public domain and so anyone can see your profile, unless you have it steathly locked down and what's the point of that. 

 In fact, I think as a manager you should extend an invitation your directs on LinkedIn to connect with you.  There shouldn't be anything secret and would demonstrate openness and professionalism.

Go for it!

 

 

Condor's picture

Do not recall having listened to the Podcast a while back it touched on connecting with Directs however, I could wrong

Thanks for your input, worth consideration

Condor's picture

Do not recall having listened to the Podcast a while back it touched on connecting with Directs however, I could wrong

Thanks for your input, worth consideration

Condor's picture

Do not recall having listened to the Podcast a while back it touched on connecting with Directs however, I could wrong

Thanks for your input, worth consideration

jrb3's picture

My opinion:  you're over-thinking, and misunderstanding the purpose of social media in general (and LinkedIn in particular).

LinkedIn is for professional connections.  Just because you're not in the office, doesn't mean you're disconnected from professional context.  What you post there, in professional context, is meant to be seen in professional context.

I'm pretty private outside the office, and relatively close with personal affairs.  (Some openness where relevant, but nothing uncomfortable for me or my household or friends.)  I see LinkedIn as professional context;  I ask for and accept links rather freely.  If I want some contacts to see something, but not others, well, that's what email is for.  It's fine for my professional network to know that my wife has returned to the workforce;  I'm not comfortable sharing with the same set of people her opinion of the commute or concerns about how it might affect our children.  That's for a different set of people, contacted by other means.

Should you really need two disjunct sets of professional contacts online in LinkedIn, set up and use two accounts.  You lose some of the benefit of the network that way, though -- people can't stumble across others as easily through you.

-- Joseph