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This made me laugh so hard:
Mark said that listeners were "satisfied"... that is the biggest understatement I have ever heard!!

Then Mark (or was it Mike?) went on to thank us. I was stunned... I think we, the recipients of the amazing information Mike and Mark provide, are the ones who should be thanking them endlessly.

So thank you, Mike and Mark, from a listener who is far more than just satisfied!

ifindallas's picture

Agree with Tom. I appreciate you thanking your listeners, but it is us who have to thank you guys. You deliver great content!. I have been a member and regular listener for less than a year, and I still have a lot of casts to go through.

Can't wait to learn the dates of the 6 Effective Managers Conferences, hopefully I will be able to sign up for one of them. Congrats for planning on conducting at least one of them in Europe. Think Amsterdam is a good location, sends the message that everybody in Europe is welcome. As a European living and working in the US, I truly appreciate your becoming more and more sensitive to your global audience.

I really look forward to another year of great content!

Eva

juliahhavener's picture

Somewhere along the way I noticed you guys didn't TALK about your 'other' jobs anymore, but never knew that you'd phased them out entirely. For one, I'm glad to hear it. It means you're able to make a living doing something you love and believe in and it means that there will be more time (and money) for you to invest in this thing we call Manager Tools. Color me ecstatic.

And here I just thought you two were the most phenomenal time management masters EVER.

mauzenne's picture

Thanks, all! As always, you all are very kind!

Mike

skwanch's picture

[quote]And here I just thought you two were the most phenomenal time management masters EVER.[/quote]

Which is still probably true . . .

On that note . . . I have a question: would you guys be willing to share some practical, 'here's what you do' type advice on how to balance a 'day job' and an entrepreneurial venture (ie. 'start a business while working'). I'm an accounting professional by day, and musician/entrepreneur by night, and I struggle with my '2nd career' not getting enough of my time and efforts sometimes. I'm in the process of applying GTD, and can see that that would help, but . . . you guys are my gurus so your advice would have motivational value above and beyond the 'mere' content.

TIA . .

TomW's picture

[quote="skwanch"] I have a question: would you guys be willing to share some practical, 'here's what you do' type advice on how to balance a 'day job' and an entrepreneurial venture (ie. 'start a business while working'). I'm an accounting professional by day, and musician/entrepreneur by night, and I struggle with my '2nd career' not getting enough of my time and efforts sometimes. I'm in the process of applying GTD, and can see that that would help, but . . . you guys are my gurus so your advice would have motivational value above and beyond the 'mere' content. .[/quote]

that could be interesting. A lot of managers (at least in my experience) are explicitly prohibited from outside professional practice at all.

I can't see any company prohibiting you from playing in a band at night (as long as it does not effect your performance during the day), but the entrepreneur might violate a few employment conditions.

sholden's picture

My employer has an outside employment form that goes up the mgmt change and the legal department to make sure there is no conflict of interest issues.

I have not had any resistance to my outside endeavors which I see as complimentary to my overall professional growth and networking.

My employer has gotten more out of me because of my outside efforts then they ever would have if they disallowed it. IMHO it pays major dividends to let me grow outside of work.

Steve

skwanch's picture

[quote]that could be interesting. A lot of managers (at least in my experience) are explicitly prohibited from outside professional practice at all. [/quote]

Here in Sili Valley, with the history and culture of so many companies being 'started in a garage', such a policy would quickly ensure the exodus of talent. Non-compete clauses, sure; but a blanket proscription would be the KOD (kiss of death).

TomW's picture

[quote="skwanch"][quote]that could be interesting. A lot of managers (at least in my experience) are explicitly prohibited from outside professional practice at all. [/quote]

Here in Sili Valley, with the history and culture of so many companies being 'started in a garage', such a policy would quickly ensure the exodus of talent. Non-compete clauses, sure; but a blanket proscription would be the KOD (kiss of death).[/quote]

This isn't about the same thing. We're talking about manager- or director-level people ("Manager Tools"), not individual contributers. It's really easy for a manager/director to find themselves in a conflict of interest situation if they are working in the same field on the side.

There's a big difference between a SysAdmin installing networks on the weekends and a director of finance doing some accounting work for another firm. Once you reach a certain level of access to confidential corporate information, your ability to work independent of that knowledge is seriously diminished.

skwanch's picture

[quote]This isn't about the same thing. We're talking about manager- or director-level people ("Manager Tools"), not individual contributers. It's really easy for a manager/director to find themselves in a conflict of interest situation if they are working in the same field on the side. [/quote]

Key phrase; "in the same field" - that's not the same thing as a blanket proscription. That would fall under the non-compete clause I mentioned.

Nothing wrong w/ a director of finance at a chip mfr working to start a restaurant, for example.

(Or, in my case, a controller of a fulfillment company working on building/creating new service offerings in the music education/entertainment svcs market. )

(... if I attach a smiley will it make me seem less of an argumentative jerk? :lol: )

TomW's picture

[quote="skwanch"][quote]This isn't about the same thing. We're talking about manager- or director-level people ("Manager Tools"), not individual contributers. It's really easy for a manager/director to find themselves in a conflict of interest situation if they are working in the same field on the side. [/quote]

Key phrase; "in the same field" - that's not the same thing as a blanket proscription. That would fall under the non-compete clause I mentioned.

Nothing wrong w/ a director of finance at a chip mfr working to start a restaurant, for example.

(Or, in my case, a controller of a fulfillment company working on building/creating new service offerings in the music education/entertainment svcs market. )

(... if I attach a smiley will it make me seem less of an argumentative jerk? :lol: )[/quote]

You don't seem argumentative to me at all. To me, it's fun to have real debates on a topic.

I have to agree with you that as an individual, going on your own is a good thing and can make a huge improvement in your own quality of life.

As a manager.... how does it benefit your current company/organization?