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Hi guys

Being back from the conference in the office and thinking on how can I implement everything we learned, I was hit by a new challenge. I got a call from the headhunter. Not that I'm too much exited about that, but for me it raised a new question - on how would I need to reflect the latest MT Conference on my resume?

Let me intrigue you a little. Some of us said that the latest conference was the best training ever they have received during their entire career. Right? And the majority agreed. Including myself. Then the question becomes, if it was that great, how can we effectively explain it also to the others what happened to us and WHY is it that great. On how will it improve our future employer's life and bottom line. Can we measure it? And what's even most challenging. This must be SHORT and I guess no more than couple of sentences. Otherwise your resume won't fit on one page any longer. And I have seen great comments about the conference in the discussion forums. Can't use any of that - too long!

I must admit for me it's difficult. Plus I'm also sure that I alone will not come up with the best answer either.

The positive side of the problem is that if you all want to be effective MT managers. Then you all should have a need to update your resume within the next 11 week period, right?

So let's get started together? Any ideas on this issue?
And I do not feel insulted at all if you say that I'm a bit off the track here.

best wishes
Liivo Leismann :wink:

kklogic's picture

Hi, Liivo! I'm glad you posted because I didn't want to lose touch with you. This is Kathie that sat with you, Steve and Terrence late on Thursday night.

I am interested in hearing how folks answer this. Best of luck to you with this potential opportunity.

pmoriarty's picture

As much as I'd like to say list it, I would say leave it off.

The average hiring manager who doesn't know about MT won't be able to distinguish this training from the zillions of other, less effective ones. She will probably wonder why you listed it.

Managers that are clued into MT will already know that you are as well from the format of your resume. :)

trandell's picture

I agree with pmoriarty. As great as MT and all things related to MT are, the percentage of hiring managers and HR people that know about it is small (purely based on my experience anyway). Anyone reading your resume with no knowledge of MT is going to wonder why you put a conference on your resume. Also, what is on your resume must tie in with accomplishments. That makes the real challenge showing how good of a manager you are on a resume. That's something I have not figured out for myself...yet.

MattJBeckwith's picture

[quote="pmoriarty"]Managers that are clued into MT will already know that you are as well from the format of your resume. :)[/quote]

Paul, that is a great point!!!

asteriskrntt1's picture

You can always have a secondary sheet with all your professional development and other peripheral information.

I am sure that in no short order, you can come up with some accomplishments from what you learned at the conference... increased O3s, improved communication etc leading to some improved metrics (faster turnaround, reduced expenses, whatever).

jeffh's picture

[quote="asteriskrntt1"]I am sure that in no short order, you can come up with some accomplishments from what you learned at the conference... increased O3s, improved communication etc leading to some improved metrics (faster turnaround, reduced expenses, whatever).[/quote]

I think this point is the key. Embed your conference learnings as accomplishments WITH DATA. I personally have a lot of data about communication gaps before manager tools. Things like project cycletime, cycletime for a particular project phase, # of missed deadlines, average delay from original plan to actual complete date. I'm working to turn this sort of data into a before/after performance matrix. Should have results in 6-9 months.

Jeff

Anonymous's picture

A second sheet? ACk!

And, to Liivo's question, I think the answer is a qualified no.

The resume is designed to speak the READER's language (as is all good communication). It is unlikely that many will know what Manager Tools is, and will therefore grade it less than a Franklin/Covey seminar, and they are rarely included.

If you felt a need to stress managerial competence, and wanted to show such training as a bullet, then yes...but not really because it's Manager Tools (as of yet)... just because you took SOME training.

Mark

(PS: Be prepared, if you do so, to talk about the training and its value, as opposed to assuming there is knowledge.)