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Is there a cast (or set of casts) that walks through the hiring process relative to taking applicants through interviews, then making an offer, and negotiation?

The real questions about the hiring process I have are:

1. When do you notify #2, #3, etc.?  There are so many things that could happen to #1 at the offer, or even the accepted stage, that having a plan B makes sense.  To be professional, we need to notify #2 and #3 as soon as we know they won't get an offer - but when really is that?  Is there a guideline?

2. As you are going through the interview process, at what point do you stop looking at applicants?  I worry that I get into a mode that says "What if the next guy is a little better than the guy I have now and I miss out?"  At some point, though, I have to pull the trigger - are there recommendations about how to proceed?

I'm hoping there is a simple set of guidelines that talk about the process (rather than individual components of the process) of hiring someone: create a job description, post position, gather applicants, interview, make offer to candidate, decline remaining candidates.  

Thanks - 

Steve

Kevin1's picture

Hi Steve

MT's guidance is detailed and spread out over multiple casts.

For example, your first question is covered under the podcast

https://www.manager-tools.com/2009/02/how-handle-two-viable-job-candidates

Use the map of the universe to see what hiring advice is around

For me, I halt looking for more candidates when I have someone who meets my minimum criteria and I want to make an offer to them.  I set the bar very high, so meeting that standard is pretty impressive.

If I have remaining candidates who look as good on paper, but I am yet to interview them, I may continue with just those candidates. However, it would have to be a short list and a short time span as impressive candidates don't generally hang around very long before someone else makes them an offer.

Hope that helps.

Kev

 

roycesj's picture

Thanks -- I'll start there!  I appreciate the response.