podcasts

How To Handle Meeting Killers - The Rambler

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • What do I do with difficult people in my meetings?
  • How do I keep control of my meetings?
  • How do I change meeting behavior?

This guidance recommends how to address behaviors in meetings that reduce meeting effectiveness, based on a popular 2012 Wall Street Journal article. This Chapter deals with handling a Rambler – someone who talks and talks and talks ... and talks.

A recent WSJ article headlined “Meet The Meeting Killers” talked about how different behaviors in meetings can ruin the meeting. It’s in the 15 May 2012 edition, and is available to non-subscribers, at least for a time.

This is our answer to those behaviors. And, we’ll address both running meetings of your team, and cross-functional meetings, where you have less direct authority.


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Admit Your Mistakes

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • Should managers admit their mistakes?
  • How should I tell my directs I made a mistake?
  • Should I tell my boss about my mistakes?

This guidance recommends admitting your mistakes openly as a manager, to your team, to enhance candor and openness from your team members.

Mark has often said that his second book is going to be called, The Candid Manager. The lack of candor in the workplace only becomes obvious to professionals when they work in one of the rare places – usually it’s a tight knit team – where candor rules.

There are ways to increase candor. The first is to admit your mistakes, at least on a small scale. Here’s how.


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Never Ask A Question Of A Direct (Whose Answer You Don’t Intend to Honor)

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • Why do I always ask my directs to do things?
  • Can I command my directs to do things?
  • What do I do if my direct refuses my request?

We recently published guidance recommending that managers ask directs for their efforts, rather than commanding. “Ask Don’t Tell” comes from sales, but sales is about relationships and persuasion much like effective managing is. But several folks have asked, isn’t there a risk of being told “no”?

Yes there is.


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Executive Career Management - If Not You Who?

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • How do I assess the competition for a job I want?
  • How do I win the job I want?
  • Can I use this method with my team?

This guidance describes a simple way executive succession planning is often done, and the key to mastering it.

One of the ways that senior leadership positions are determined is by asking many senior leaders whom they think would be good in the role. Sometimes, this takes the form of asking the very people being considered for the position. The right answer probably isn’t what you think.


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How To Handle Meeting Killers - The Silent Plotter

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • What do I do with difficult people in my meetings?
  • How do I keep control of my meetings?
  • How do I change meeting behavior?

This guidance recommends how to address behaviors in meetings that reduce meeting effectiveness, based on a popular 2012 Wall Street Journal article.

This Chapter deals with handling a Silent Plotter – someone who tries to kill every idea, even after everyone’s agreed.


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Work Family Balance - Chapter 1 - Go Home

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • How do I achieve work/family balance?
  • Is work/family balance a myth?
  • How do I fit all my work in and go home on time?

This guidance describes the fundamental error in trying to achieve “Work-Family Balance” and how to solve it forever.

The Work-Family Balance challenge is such a common question that it inevitably becomes one of the first answers Mark gives when he takes open questions at gatherings.

The answer to the problem is simple, and it starts with understanding that we have all been solving the wrong problem.


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The Part After Feedback - Chapter One - Part 2

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • What do I do when directs argue with feedback?
  • Shouldn't I allow directs to discuss issues with me?
  • When should I allow directs to discuss issues with me?

The conclusion of our guidance on how to respond initially to a direct who pushes back in various ways to an instance of feedback.

One of the most frequent questions Manager Tools gets about giving negative feedback to directs is what to do about pushback. In this first of a series, we’ll address the first rule: you, as the manager, get to go first. There will be plenty of guidance later about all the different kinds of pushback, but for now, the way to win the moment is to see where the leverage is.


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The Part After Feedback - Chapter One - Part 1

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • What do I do when directs argue with feedback?
  • Shouldn't I allow directs to discuss issues with me?
  • When should I allow directs to discuss issues with me?

This guidance describes how to respond initially to a direct who pushes back in various ways to an instance of feedback.

One of the most frequent questions Manager Tools gets about giving negative feedback to directs is what to do about pushback. In this first of a series, we’ll address the first rule: you, as the manager, get to go first. There will be plenty of guidance later about all the different kinds of pushback, but for now, the way to win the moment is to see where the leverage is.


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Ask For What You Want

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • Should I ask or tell my directs what I want them to do?
  • What should I say to make my directs do what I want them?
  • How do I make sure they answer?

This guidance recommends asking your directs for work to be done - meaning requesting things in the form of a question – rather than stating your desire for something to occur.

Most managers, when they need something done, tell their directs what to do. Telling relies on role power. It works, but there’s a better, more strategic way: asking.


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How To Deliver A Shot Across The Bow Review

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • How do I deliver a review to a poor performer?
  • How do I let them know that their performance is inadequate?
  • How do I document a Shot Across The Bow review?

This guidance describes how to deliver an unofficial performance evaluation when your direct is failing and may either not realize it or is resisting changing.

For a poor performer, your corporate culture may still require you to inflate their performance evaluation. If you gave them a truthful review, they would be fired. So, you give them an unofficial review, but it’s also a shot across the bow review – because it contemplates termination.


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