interviews

How To Be Ready For A Hiring Market Upturn - Part 2

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • What do I need to do to be ready?
  • Why do I need to practice interview answers now?
  • Who do I need to contact?

This cast concludes our guidance on how to prepare for the coming hiring market upturn.


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How To Be Ready For A Hiring Market Upturn - Part 1

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • What do I need to do to be ready?
  • Why do I need to practice interview answers now?
  • Who do I need to contact?

This cast gives our guidance on how to prepare for the coming hiring market upturn.

As we record this cast in early 2011, the signs of hiring recovering from the recession are still interspersed with more negative indicators. However, whether it's in the next few months or before the end of the year, the recovery will come. The world economies have always and will always cycle through growth and recession, and we need to be as prepared for an upturn as we are for a downturn.

It's not only growth which fuels empty vacancies. As the labor force begins to feel more secure, the quit rate goes up and the liquidity of the labor market increases. That's what we're seeing right now, ahead of the upturn. Whatever the current situation when you hear this cast, you need to be prepared.

Let's not all make the same old, "rushing around getting my resume ready when I get a call mistake" TODAY … because now things happen faster, and you've got social media to worry about.


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The Eight Minute Rule

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • What time should I arrive before an interview?
  • Why is 8 minutes the right time?
  • Why should I not be too early to an interview?

This cast gives our guidance on when to arrive for an interview.

It turns out that there is a perfect time to arrive before an interview. Too early, and the interviewer is not ready and feels flustered and hurried by your arrival. Too close to your interview time, they’re not sure whether you’re coming or not, and start to worry. After your interview time, and there are two problems – one, you’ve started your interview with a negative, and two, you have a shorter time to get yourself out of that hole.

Does it really matter? Yes. The idea is that you want the interviewer to like you. The way you do that is to make their life easier. The way you do that is to be on time. Being on time means not too early and not too late.

What is the perfect time? 8 minutes before your interview.


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Pre-Interview Prep Chapter 2

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • What do you need to do before an interview?
  • What do you need specifically for THIS interview?
  • Do you have questions for the interviewer?

This cast gives our guidance on what to prepare for your interview.

Our interview series gives the most comprehensive guidance on how to interview. As we continue to build our audience, we receive questions which make us realize we left something out, or we weren’t specific enough.

This cast is one of those which addresses an issue about which we realize we could have been more detailed. That is, what do you prepare for the interview? We don’t mean in the broad sense of preparing to discuss your experience, or how to answer the interviewer’s questions – that’s covered in the interview series. We mean in the sense of the few things you want to make sure are top of mind just before you go into the interview.

In one of our casts we will describe what to do when you’re waiting in reception for the interviewer. We’ll recommend you have several 3 x 5 cards with the pertinent reminders on them so that you can review them while you wait. This cast gives the specifics of what needs to be on those cards.


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Interviewing - What To Do While You Wait

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • What do I do when waiting in the building for an interview?
  • Can I make phone calls while waiting for an interview?
  • Should I talk to people whilst waiting for an interview?

This cast gives our guidance on what you do while you wait in reception for an interviewer.

We've given this guidance on what to do when you sit in reception waiting for an interviewer, but it applies equally to any meeting where you're in an unfamiliar building and have to wait to be collected.

Like lots of our guidance around interview etiquette it's a mixture of the practical things to do and what not to do. Many of the things interviewees do are things they THINK give a good impression. Unfortunately, in many cases they're wrong.


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Interview Etiquette

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • What is correct behavior during an interview?
  • Should I take a drink if offered?
  • What should I have prepared to talk about?

This cast gives our guidance on how to conduct yourself during an interview.

We’ve said it before, and we’ll probably say it again, interviews are nerve-wracking. For everyone. In some ways it’s like meeting your girlfriend’s parents for the first time. There’s that feeling of desperately wanting to impress and of being on your best behavior. We call the right behavior in that circumstance ‘etiquette’ or ‘manners’. Fortunately, etiquette rescues us during interviews too.

Debrett’s Guide to British Behaviour says of manners: Manners are valuable in this world for the simple reason that well-mannered people know how to set others around at their ease, know how to make the world feel a more civilised, friendly and calm place, and like to put others' comfort ahead of their own. Would you be more or less likely to employ someone who made you feel that way? Of course, you would be more likely, we all want to be around people like that. So, what to do?


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What To Take To An Interview

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • Do I take a briefcase or bag to an interview?
  • Do I take copies of my resume to an interview?
  • What do I need to have with me at an interview?

This cast gives our guidance on what to take to an interview.

In our experience interviewing, we’ve seen everything. People who appear to have been away from home several weeks judging by the size of the bag they bring. People who ‘travel light’ and have to borrow a pen and a piece of paper when we give them details of the next step. People who want to show us their artist’s portfolio. People who pull a large sheet of paper out of their bag and start drawing the intricacies of their invention.

There’s a wide range behavior in interviews. What though, are the right things to take to an interview?

Here's an example of a portfolio.


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How To Answer Questions About Career History - Part 2

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • Do I have to tell the truth about my career history?
  • How do I structure my answer about my career history?
  • Can I make my career history better?

This cast concludes Career Tool's recommendations for answering questions about your career history.

  1. TELL THE TRUTH! Truth is Not Your Enemy – An “Answer” Is
  2. Decide on an Answer and Practice
  3. Above All Be Honest
  4. Short, No Blame
  5. Matter of Fact Delivery
  6. Add In Follow Up Information
  7. Stop Worrying About It


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How To Answer Questions About Career History - Part 1

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • Do I have to tell the truth about my career history?
  • How do I structure my answer about my career history?
  • Can I make my career history better?

This cast describes Career Tool's recommendations for answering questions about your career history.

We get questions all the time from members who feel that their career history is less than stellar and they have concerns about just what to say when asked "why did you leave this job?" or "what prompted that decision?" In fact, sometimes they go as far as not interviewing because they are so concerned about this question.

The good news is that there is a way to answer this question, and that actually, though it is often asked, it's much less important to interviewers than you might think. The art of answering it is to assign it it's proper importance in your mind, decide how you're going to answer and concentrate on the parts of your interview which demonstrate your competence. You might get a minus point here, but the rest of your interview can add up to so many positive points that it becomes irrelevant.

  1. TELL THE TRUTH! Truth is Not Your Enemy – An “Answer” Is
  2. Decide on an Answer and Practice
  3. Above All Be Honest
  4. Short, No Blame
  5. Matter of Fact Delivery
  6. Add In Follow Up Information
  7. Stop Worrying About It


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External Interviews and Careers - Chapter 1

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • I've been invited to an interview, should I go?
  • Should I tell anyone I'm going?
  • I'm not sure about the industry or specialty, should I still go?

This cast describes the importance of external interviewing in career management, and how to begin to handle the interview.

This cast started the same way our cast on internal interviews as a career management strategy did. Back then, we had gotten a question from a member who was being asked to interview for a particular job in his company. He called to ask what to do. He was wavering. Mark was STUNNED – OF COURSE you interview! It was one of those academic creep moments that we have pretty regularly.

For the record, for those of you who don't remember, we said: ALWAYS say yes, at least in part because saying NO is a significant career statement. And, you can yes to the interview and say NO to a forthcoming offer.

In this cast's case, Mark got a call from a competent and sharp engineer, who had been asked to interview at another company for a sales position. He wasn't really sure about sales (no engineer ever seems to be, much to most of their unknown chagrin), and wondered too about the location. As Mark was walking him through the basics, he thought, hey, we haven't done this cast yet; I'm such an idiot.

  1. GO!
  2. This is Career OPPORTUNITY Management
  3. Don't Worry About Changes In Specialty Or Industry As Much As You Think
  4. Be Quiet About It


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