communication

How To Deal With Bad Interviews: Chapter 2 - Distracted Interviewers

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • What do I do when an interview goes wrong?
  • How can I be successful in an interview with a bad interviewer?
  • How do I answer questions in a bad interview?

This is another chapter in our guidance on how to deal with bad interviewers: those that are distracted.

Everyone has off days - and they sometimes fall on the day you're carrying out interviews. Everyone has days when it's all hitting the fan and the interviewees for that day are already on the way. Interviewers are human. It's possible that they are distracted.

What can you do as the interviewee?


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Email and The High C

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • How do I know I have email from a High C?
  • How do I respond effectively to email from a High C?
  • How do I start and end an email to a High C?

How High C's use email, and how to effectively use email to communicate with them.

At the end of the ECC conference, we give a demonstration of the four DiSC styles and how they think of and treat email. It's a great, fun day, and email is the highlight.

It's also one of the easiest ways to introduce yourself to tailoring your communications to other DiSC styles - you have a lot of information in the form of hundreds of emails to analyze people's styles and plenty of time when you're replying to get it right. You'll be astounded at the results you get from this simple change.


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Presentation - Voice

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • How do I use my voice effectively during presentations?
  • What elements of my voice can I change?
  • What should I be attempting to do during presentations?

How to use your voice in presentations.

Presentations regularly come in the top 10 lists about what people are most afraid of. And, we regularly sit through terrible presentations at client sites. Presentations fall into both the Christmas rule: you do it rarely, it's important, it's bound to go poorly, AND the one-eyed man is king rule: you just have to be a little bit better and you'll knock your audience's socks off.

How do you do that? Start with your voice.


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Feedback From Your Directs - What To Say - Part 2

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • What do I say when my directs give me feedback?
  • Can I say no to feedback from my directs?
  • Can I give my directs negative feedback for giving me feedback?

This cast concludes our guidance on what to say when your directs say, "Can I give YOU some feedback?"

It happened to Mark recently. He was teaching the feedback model to a bunch of CEOs. He had made it clear the MT feedback model was only for managers to directs. He finishes the talk, and the emcee says, in front of everybody, "Can I give YOU some feedback?" And, of course, then he mangles the model. At least it wasn't negative feedback in front of a hundred CEOs.

What do you do when one of your directs turns the feedback model on its head? You know it's wrong. So, can you say no? And the answer is yes, sort of, sometimes, but not really.


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Feedback From Your Directs - What To Say - Part 1

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • What do I say when my directs give me feedback?
  • Can I say no to feedback from my directs?
  • Can I give my directs negative feedback for giving me feedback?

This guidance tells you what to say when your directs say, "Can I give YOU some feedback?"

It happened to Mark recently. He was teaching the feedback model to a bunch of CEOs. He had made it clear the MT feedback model was only for managers to directs. He finishes the talk, and the emcee says, in front of everybody, "Can I give YOU some feedback?" And, of course, then he mangles the model. At least it wasn't negative feedback in front of a hundred CEOs.

What do you do when one of your directs turns the feedback model on its head? You know it's wrong. So, can you say no? And the answer is yes, sort of, sometimes, but not really.


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Ending A Conversation With A Senior Person

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • How do I make sure I don't overstay my welcome?
  • How do I know when the conversation is over?
  • How do I excuse myself?

Our guidance on how to know when to end a conversation with a senior person.

We see a lot of advice about asking for informational interviews or talking to more senior people in your company about how to get ahead. We don't disagree with the advice in general - the problem is it's always given from the point of view of the person who wants something, and rarely takes into account what the senior person in the conversation might want or need.

If the conversation doesn't go well, then you may not be able to use that relationship to get more information in the future. One of the tricks to having it go well, is knowing when to end it. In this cast, we'll tell you how to know when.


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And Not But Meeting Ground Rule

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • What is the 'and not but meeting ground rule'?
  • Why can't I say but?
  • What do I say instead of but?

This guidance recommends a standing ground rule at all meetings: No "buts," only "and".

The most frequent behavior we all engage in at work is communication. And, for most of us, we don't think about it much. We were never really "taught" how to communicate, though we did "learn" it.

This creates problems for us at work, though. We "learned" when we weren't in a professional environment. And the professional environment requires us to work in close proximity to others. We bring our "learned" behaviors. They bring theirs. Thus, conflict. It's time to start learning new behaviors.


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I Am A Former Peer

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • How do I deal with one of my peers becoming my manager?
  • How do I treat my new manager?
  • Can I complain about peers being promoted?

Our guidance how to deal with not being promoted, when your former team member is now your boss.

One of the most requested Manager Tools casts was "How To Manage a Disgruntled, Non-Promoted Direct". The cast was written for new managers whose former peers were struggling with the new relationship.

But what if you're the person who wasn't promoted. How do you deal with your own feelings and develop a new, productive, respectful, manager-direct relationship?


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Routine Town Hall Meetings - Part 2

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • What's a town hall meeting?
  • How long should they be?
  • Do I need handouts?

This cast concludes our guidance on how to run a Routine Town Hall Meeting for your organization.

We've talked many times about the importance of managerial communications. Our sample communications plan is one of the more requested documents from us. It shows what we recommend a typical manager do in terms of regular comms with her team, using different media and different frequencies and covering different topics.

And, we've mentioned many times Horstman's Law of Organizational Communications: Say something 7 times and half of your people will say they've heard it once. Every organization has its own sandpaper, rubbing away at your meaning.

One way to reach further down and have more control of your message is to conduct a Town Hall meeting. This is the final meeting that Manager Tools would consider "routine" though it's certainly not frequent. It's in the line of Weekly One on Ones, Weekly Staff Meetings, and periodic Skip Levels.


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Routine Town Hall Meetings - Part 1

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • What's a town hall meeting?
  • How long should they be?
  • Do I need handouts?

This guidance describes how to run a Routine Town Hall Meeting for your organization.

We've talked many times about the importance of managerial communications. Our sample communications plan is one of the more requested documents from us. It shows what we recommend a typical manager do in terms of regular comms with her team, using different media and different frequencies and covering different topics.

And, we've mentioned many times Horstman's Law of Organizational Communications: Say something 7 times and half of your people will say they've heard it once. Every organization has its own sandpaper, rubbing away at your meaning.

One way to reach further down and have more control of your message is to conduct a Town Hall meeting. This is the final meeting that Manager Tools would consider "routine" though it's certainly not frequent. It's in the line of Weekly One on Ones, Weekly Staff Meetings, and periodic Skip Levels.


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