career

Post-Resignation Team Meeting - Part 2

The conclusion of our guidance on how to have a brief meeting with your team immediately after you resign.

We get the question of how to tell one’s team one has resigned frequently. We think it’s because now that many of us have developed close relationships with their directs, they want to say more than they would have before the built those relationships. That’s a good thing, but there are simple rules to follow.


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Post-Resignation Team Meeting - Part 1

This guidance explains how to have a brief meeting with your team immediately after you resign.

We get the question of how to tell one’s team one has resigned frequently. We think it’s because now that many of us have developed close relationships with their directs, they want to say more than they would have before the built those relationships. That’s a good thing, but there are simple rules to follow.


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Self Development Informal 360°

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • How do I know if my boss is receptive to questions?
  • What questions should I ask?
  • What should I do next?

This guidance tells you how to potentially get some informal self development guidance from your manager by asking three simple questions.

Almost every manager wants more performance communications from their boss. But very few bosses give it. If you’re a manager, and you have thoughts about further managerial roles or executive life, what can you do to politely and professionally get some insight into what your boss thinks about your abilities?

Ask her three simple questions.


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Google Job Search Tips Chapter 1

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • How do I use Google to find a job?
  • What search terms should I use?
  • How do I find people to help me in my job search with Google?

How to make find new relationships to help in your job search, using Google.

This cast came together as a result of two conversations. First, a forum post in which a member had taken a role below his skill level. The result was in 18 months of job searching and 50+ applications, nothing but rejection. When they read that, Wendii and Mark banged their heads on the desk and said: stop making applications and start talking to people.

That’s easier said than done, however, judging by an email we were sent. This person asked: I am embarrassed to admit I am blind to what good companies are in my area. I didn't realize it until you answered the first question about how to
identify a good employer. That is all the more reason to get started and
engage my network! Do you have any recommendations or contacts in this area
that may be able to help?

The answer was no, we didn’t. But we could google some good opportunities to meet people. How? In this cast we’re going to give you the first step. There’ll be more to follow.


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Keeping Your Search Confidential

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • How do I keep my boss from finding out I'm looking for a new job?
  • How do I interview without my boss finding out?
  • is it disingenuous to interview with the competition?

How to keep your current employer from finding out about your search for a new job.

We recently got an email from a listener which said: “I listened to your Job Boards cast, which said to post a profile of myself and my resume on 8 job boards. In your opinion, is this safe to do while I am currently employed? What if my company stumbles on my profile? Thanks!”

We have answered this question before, but in passing in other casts. So once and for all, how do you keep your current employer from finding about your search for a new job?


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Generation Y Careers #1: Parents Unwelcome

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • Can my parent talk to my boss?
  • Why should I not involve my parents in my career?
  • How do I stop my parents from being involved in my career?

This cast recommends that Generation Y professionals keep their parents out of their careers.

A lot has been written about Generation Y, or the Millennial Generation. Several books have come out – the Trophy Generation, Not Everyone Gets a Trophy. LOTS of articles have been written.

The entire Generation Y management and career advice business is dross. Really, really bad advice, both to Gen Y professionals and to their bosses. Perhaps the one silver lining in all the bad advice is that many professionals and managers will read it and say, "anyone who publishes stuff like this can’t be very good when it comes to career advice, I think I’ll disregard their future stuff."

One of the "trends" of Generation Y is that because they were doted on by their parents, their parents get involved in their careers. Career Tools has some guidance on that.

  1. Parents Must NEVER Communicate About Professional Matters To Your Associates
  2. Politely Tell Parents Not To Do So
  3. Parental Involvement In Your Career Sends a Message That You Are a Child


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What Do You Want To Do?

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • How do I answer the question 'What do you want to do'?
  • How do I know what I want to do?
  • What do I say if I want to do anything?

This cast explains an important career search question, and how to answer it: "What do you want to do, and where do you want to do it?"

You're going to be asked this question, and you have to know how to answer it, without limiting yourself. It's one of those fleeting career moments whose outcome is defined likely BEFORE the moment arrives.


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Career Crisis Email

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • How can I help someone who has been laid off?
  • What do I say to someone who has been laid off?
  • When should I contact someone who has been laid off?

This cast describes your initial communications with a friend or associate whose career is at risk, for whatever reason.

We read in the Wall Street Journal this week about a bank failure in the US due to the mortgage/debt crisis the markets are facing. As it turns out, we have several Manager Tools members there, one of whom is a good friend of ours. Mark sent a quick email to this executive. When Mark mentioned to another member that he had done so, the member said, "I didn't want to intrude, so I didn't say anything." As Mark asked around some more, he discovered that others felt similarly. "Didn't want him to be embarrassed that I knew." "Didn't know what to say." "Didn't think I could help."

Well, they won't be embarrassed, here's what to say, and you CAN help. And, this cast has a nice surprise ending.


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Sharing Your References

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • Do I put 'references available on request' on my resume?
  • How many references do I need?
  • How do I manage my references?

This cast tells you how to handle requests for your references when engaged in a job search.

Even though "References Available Upon Request" is no longer a good idea, reference CHECKING is on the rise and will only increase in the coming years. It seems like since resumes don't include the age-old line -- the why of which we'll share -- somehow far too many job seekers are caught off-guard by reference requests. Ahh, Horstman's Christmas Rule!

We'll tell you how to manage and share your references in this cast. And hey, if you're maintaining your network, this one is EASY!


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Horstman's Wager (Part 1 of 2)

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • How do I play an interview to ensure I get an offer?
  • What's the worst outcome of an interview?
  • How do I win at interviews?

This cast is about interview preparation, and the need for ethics and candor during the process.

We've been pleased by the demand for our interviewing product - close to 1,000 purchases so far, and the early feedback has been quite powerful. If you'd like to order, you can do that here.

One of the tenets that distinguishes the casts is its emphasis on preparation. One of the Forum posts actually suggests that folks buy before they think they need it, because many of our suggestions require time to implement (it can take months, done right).

BUT... there are those who disagree. There are interviewees who believe that the key to interviewing is to "play the game". Many of these folks will tell you that the way to prepare is learn about the company (false, and proven so in Lesson #1), so that one can "be what the company wants".

Those who have suggested that to Mark meet with his famous response: "you've never seen Horstman's Wager, have you?"

In this cast, we'll discuss Horstman's Wager: why "playing the game" is the kiss of death in interviewing.


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