Drowning

in

Fortune has published an excerpt from Jim Collin's new book, 'Great by Choice'. Whilst 'Good to Great' has become more controversial in hindsight, this excerpt has some interesting parts - enough to make me pre-order the book.

One of the themes in Manager Tools is that you have to ask for more, and you have to measure in order to see if you're getting it. Whether it's individuals or your team, we believe that if your company grows by 10% and you only grow by 7%, you're not only not moving forward, you're going backwards.

In the excerpt, Collin's talks about the CEO of Stryker, who set a target that the company would grow at 20% every year. "Brown" the article says "created the "Snorkel Award," given to those who lagged behind; 20% was the watermark, and if you were below it, you needed a snorkel. If your division fell behind for two years in a row, Brown would insert himself to "help," working around the clock to "help" you get back on track."

In other words, the goals was set for the company, but each division was expected to make the goal in their own right. You can do this too. If the company goal is 20%, what do you need to do for your team to get to 20%? What do you need to do as an individual to get to 20%? Because if you don't, you're in danger of drowning.

http://management.fortune.cnn.com/2011/09/30/jim-collins-great-by-choice...


Thanks Wendii. I read "Good

Thanks Wendii. I read "Good to Great" and am wondering what has become controversial in hindsight. Can you say more?