Peer One on Ones - Part 2

Questions This Guidance Answers: 
  • How do I talk to my peers about performance?
  • How do I tell my peer he's not helping me?
  • How do I tell my peer he is helping me?

This cast concludes our recommendations on why and how to meet weekly, or regularly, with your peer managers.


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what about when your peer acts unethically and unprofessionally

I had a good professional relationship with a colleague who was at similar level in an organization and also provided services to internal staff.  However, this relationship has deteriorated to the point where I have to be careful with what I say in front of her. 

Is it worth trying to build up a relationship again?

Examples of "unethical behavior".

- during selection processes, the colleague has placed an external candidate in front of other more qualified candidates  (there is a personal relationship between the two) (in one case, the boss found out and removed the colleague from the selection committee.)

- The colleague has sent out guidance for processing transactions that involve my area without previously coordinating with me.  I gave feedback and the colleague apologized but it took a lot of time to fix the issue.

- The colleague sends information to my boss about my area without prior consultation or coordination with me.  We were looking at a restructuring of the unit and while i have been deeply involved in the work, the colleague has no more than a superficial understanding.  With the justification of "urgency", the colleague made recommendations to my boss about changes that I didn't agree with and without prior conversation with me.  I responded professionally to the email with my comments and clarification.

Unprofessional

- When in meetings with the person (whether as a group or individually, if someone calls, the individual takes the call...and talks...and talks...  I will not hold meetings in this person's office, if I can help it (I gave feedback about this issues also).

-When administrative issues arise that affect this person, my team receiives emails demanding IMMEDIATE solutions to the problems (such as there is a food smell, FIX IT).  "And how could this problem even exist?  Someone must not be doing their job".   (for your imagery pleasure, please picture Varuca Salt from Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, "I want a golden goose and I want in NOW, daddy!"

How can I maintain an open relationship with the person I cannot trust him?  I have always tried to keep conversations professional and focused on work. 

Thanks,

Des